Posts Tagged ‘shoe guide’

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The greatest things in life are meant to be treated with the utmost attention and care, and shoes are no exception. By viewing shoes as a long-term investment instead of just another disposable product, you can purchase a pair of timeless, high-quality shoes without the guilt. All it takes is a little knowledge in the shoe cleaning department to ensure your shoes, heels, and boots really were made for walkin’, and that’s just what they’ll do (with some tender, loving care)!

To get started, proper care ultimately depends on the materials that comprise the whole of the shoe. Take a look below for an informative guide on working with different types of shoes and the best ways to clean them:

Leather Shoes

Leather can often be a tricky one, as there are different types of leather available including patent leather, vegan leather, and of course, leather-leather, just to name a few. Make sure you know what type of leather materials were used to avoid unnecessary damage ahead of time. Patent leather is shiny and glossy, vegan or faux leather is typically made from polyurethane, and leather is an animal skin and rawhide combination textile.

  • Patent Leather: Use a product designed for polishing patent leather-like wax, or take advantage of household items such as Vaseline or Windex (but not at the same time). Just apply a thin layer of patent leather cleaner, followed by a patent leather conditioner for lasting appeal.

  • Vegan Leather: Wipe these down with warm water using a sponge or washcloth, soap the sponge/cloth with something eco-friendly void of harsh chemicals, and give it a light scrub. Then, wipe off the soap and water with a dry cloth. Finish with vinyl conditioner.

  • Full-Grain Leather: Wipe softly with warm water, clean the rag, and wipe again with warm water. Afterwards, give them some gloss with a good cream polish. If your full-grain shoes (such as nubuck) don’t have any dirt or grime, a simple shoe brush will do the trick. Remember that water and liquids can wear down leather faster, so always resort to brushing them before going the washcloth route.

Suede

Who doesn’t love suede? It’s one of the most beloved materials for shoes because it is comfortable, warm, and soft to the touch. Suede shoes can sometimes take a little extra care than other types of material, which could be a reason why Elvis – the king of rock ‘n roll himself – warned the masses in 1956, “You can do anything, but lay off my blue suede shoes!”

To clean, use a brush specifically designed for suede. If there are any spots or stains, opt for a light sandpaper or the soft side of a nail file after brushing. Always remember to avoid water completely when cleaning suede. Water is the fastest way to destroy it, so stay away from liquids at all costs.

Reptilian

Lovers of the exotic can’t help but flock toward materials made from the skins of snakes, lizards, and crocodiles. It’s a fun, sophisticated look that pops when paired with solid outfits that display minimal designs or no patterns at all. For snakeskins, dampen a soft washcloth and wipe gently. With lizard skins, avoid water and just wipe down with a soft cloth. And lastly, you can take care of crocodile skins with a damp cloth just like snakeskins, but follow up with a soft paint brush afterward. Then, apply a conditioner made for these specific reptile skins to preserve them for years to come.

Fabric

Although fabric shoes such as canvas sneakers and mesh/nylon runners tend to break down faster due to harder usage, they are still super easy to look after. Just give them a nice brushing, then wet a warm washcloth with a small dab of eco-friendly laundry detergent for a gentle scrubbing. Wipe away the soap and it’s as simple as that!

Drying Shoes

The most recommended way to dry shoes is to simply let them dry naturally. However, if placed under the sun, be sure to take them out of the light when close to completely dry to avoid potential pitfalls like color fading. Keep in mind that most shoe materials are sensitive to sunlight, so it’s best to allow shoes to dry inside on their own. If you’re in a hurry, you can dry fabric shoes at a cool temperature in a drying machine, but keep all other shoes away from the dryer.

When looking at today’s fashions, it seems as if the latter half of the 20th century is always making a comeback in a contemporary way. Which means that even if you’re the type of woman to buy shoes like there’s no tomorrow, taking care of older shoes could definitely be of benefit when a particular style surfaces on the runways once again. When someone asks where to purchase a pair of your well-worn, well-polished shoes, you can smile with the knowledge that no one is stealing your look today.